Kokomo Perspective 01 02 2019 E Edition Page A1

The countys jail pop- ulation hit a low last month not experienced in more than two years. With a few days left in December, the months population average at the Howard County jail set a record for the low- est since May 2016. The news comes after two years of elevated jail pop- ulations, which sparked discussions among pub- lic icials concerning the potential need for a jail expansion. Multiple factors came into play to produce this low, including a year that seemingly ended with a lower arrest count in Howard County than in previous years, and some accredit work release for contributing heavily to this low mark. As of Dec. 26, the aver- age inmate population at the Howard County jail stood at 384, a noticeable decrease over the years average jail population. In 2018, the average monthly jail population stood at 440 inmates. In 2017, the average was 442, and in 2016 the monthly average jail population stood at 387. While its yet to be seen if the month of Decem- bers average will serve as an outlier or the begin- ning of a positive trend for the local justice sys- tem, Howard Superior III Judge Doug Tate, who also serves as the chair of the Howard County Community Corrections Board, believed the low point came mostly as a result of work release. I would say the big- gest reason for the fact weve seen the numbers drop is work release, said Tate. I would also attribute it to the case reallocation to some de- gree, but I believe the biggest reason for the drop is the work release facility. Right now we have over 70 individu- als serving their time in work release, and a large percentage of those indi- viduals would be in jail if they werent in work Coca-Cola and its lo- cal president EP Severns have something in com- mon: theyre both iconic. After serving as pres- ident of Coca-Cola Bot- tling Company of Koko- mo for 60 years, Severns became the well-known, personable face of the brand locally and has been there alongside countless changes the company has undergone. Now, Severns is pass- ing the torch to his son, Craig, as he announces his retirement. Severns, 88, said he was grateful to continue the business that was once owned by his father and uncles and now to have his son carry it on. Work- ing for a family-owned business, he said, was the best career he could have had. I just felt so com- fortable working for a business that my fami- ly owned. It just looked like it had a better history than maybe anyplace else I could do the work be- cause my family owned the place, said Severns, surrounded by Coca-Co- la memorabilia in his apartment at Primrose Retirement Community. Severns father and two uncles purchased the Coca-Cola franchise for Kokomo, Logansport, and Peru in 1935. From a young age, Severns said he always knew he want- ed to work for the busi- ness when he got older. So he did. He began at age 16, working part-time at the Kokomo plant while on summer breaks from Kokomo High School. When he graduated in 1949, he took on a more fulltime role while at- tending classes at IU Ko- komo, which was located at the Seiberling Man- sion at the time. A short decade later, in 1959, Severns was promoted to president of the company at the young age of 28. Coca-Cola was the most prominent soft drink around at that time, and the brand was, by many accounts, the best-known brand in the world. Craig credited a man named Robert Wood- ruff for helping turn the business into the global MORE THAN 31,000 DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY & MORE THAN 320,000 MONTHLY PAGE VIEWS AT KOKOMOPERSPECTIVE.COM Kokomoperspective.com 209 N. Main St. - Kokomo 765.452.0055 January 2, 2019 by Devin Zimmerman News Reporter dzimmerman@kokomoperspective.com by Alyx Arnett Editor editor@kokomoperspective.com Craig Dunn, William Bersbach, Denise Stover and Roger Yeoman are Registered Representatives of and securities are offered through LaSalle St. Securities LLC (LSS), a registered Broker/Dealer and member of FINRA & SIPC. Mr. Dunn and Mr. Bersbach are Investment Advisor Representatives of and advisory services are offered through Liberty Financial Advisors LLC (LFA), a Registered Investment Advisor. LSS is not affiliated with LFA or Liberty Financial Group, Inc. Investing involves risks, including the risk of principal loss. Website: www.libertyfngp.com cdunn@lasalle-st.com 1213 East Hoffer St. Kokomo, IN 765.457.1134 PLAN TODAY FOR YOUR FUTURE. Roger Yeoman Denise Stover William Bersbach Craig Dunn Anna M. Owens Inside: Section C January 2 2019 Inside: Section C PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID KOKOMO, IN PERMIT NO. 60 **************ECRWSSEDDM************** Residential & Business Customer Jail A3 Perspective Photo / Provided LEADERSHIP - EP Severns, center, will retire from Coca-Cola this month. Severns has served as president for 60 years and worked for the company for 70 years. Coca-Cola A10 Coca-Cola president to 'taste the feeling' of retirement EP Severns announces retirement after 60 years, to be succeeded by his son, Craig 2018: Year in r e v i e w As a new year begins, the Kokomo Perspective is taking a look back at the biggest stories of 2018. The past year brought a whirlwind of news to Howard County, just as every year does. From government and political developments to crime and economic development, here are the events that shaped Howard County over the last year. #1 KPD drug bust In May Kokomo Police Department, assisted by multiple outside agencies, put a huge dent in local ille- gal drug operations. That huge dent came thanks to Operation Law and Order, which involved 130 local, state, and federal icersandagentswhoex- ecuted 10 search warrants in Kokomo. The subsequent arrests, targeting a drug traf- icking operation rooted in Kokomo and extending to Georgia, led to the downfall of a cartel-like operation that was said to be responsible for the majority of the drugs coming into Kokomo. In total, 15 arrests were netted during the initial op- eration, and KPD icers even managed to thwart a murder-for-hire plot. Large quantities of drugs, $37,000 2018 A6 Jail population hits low not seen since 2016 Low comes as county prepares to expand work release to women From the Kokomo Perspective Tate

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