Kokomo Perspective 01 09 2019 E Edition Page A1

As of September, 306 Riverfront District Apart- ments in downtown of- icially was complete. So, who exactly is mov- ing into the new luxury housing option? From the looks of it, a lot of individuals from outside of Howard County are opting to live there. That, as has been stated from the onset of the project by develop- ers Flaherty and Collins and city icials, was a goal of the development. The hope was 306 River- front would help capture workers from outside of the area. According to statistics provided by Flaherty and Collins, the apart- ment complex is present- ly 37-percent occupied. Of the 199 available units in 306 Riverfront, 74 are being rented. Whats interesting is the demographic split of the apartment complex's residents. Of the 137 liv- ing at 306 Riverfront, 56 percent are from outside of the county. Residents living in the apartment complex come from 16 different states and four different countries. Dr. Andrew Barlow, who works for Commu- nity Howard Regional Health, is one of the ten- ants to move in from out of town. Barlow moved to Kokomo from Phila- delphia in August, and he settled in 306 River- front. The 32-year-old doc- tor said he primarily was looking to live in a Mid- western city to escape the issues he encountered living in Philadelphia, such as high crime rates and homelessness. He looked at other In- diana cities, but he said he just didn't see growth and development in them when compared to Kokomo. I had actually looked at other cities in the Mid- west, said Barlow. A lot of them weren't do- ing too well, or it didn't seem like there was much going on. But in Kokomo there was a lot of development going on in downtown, and there was a nice place to live. Those are big factors in where to go. Just know- ing they were investing in the downtown and it was on the up and up, those were big factors in me coming here. Coming from Philadel- phia, Barlow said he also was looking to live in an area that offered walk- ability. The development in downtown promoting walkability, he said, also lent itself to his decision to move to Kokomo. Flaherty and Collins Vice President of Devel- opment Anthony Carmo- ny said 306 Riverfront is meeting the company's expectations as far as occupancy rates are con- cerned. To this point, it's great, but we're not done yet, said Carmony. The property needs to be full before we can really de- termine exactly how it it's all panned out, but to this point we're getting what we thought. I think 56 percent from outside the county is super im- A local corrections icerrecentlygotalook at the Howard County Jail from the other side of the bars. Steven Tomes, a corrections icer at the Howard County Jail, was charged in late December with domestic battery, a class A misdemeanor. According to Howard County Sheriff Jerry Asher, the jail employee remains employed with the department. The charge itself stems from an alleged altercation on Dec. 23. According to a probable cause idavit, Kokomo Police Departmenticerswere dispatched to a residence on the 2900 block of North Apperson Avenue in reference to a domestic disturbance. When icers arrived, they made contact with the female complainant, who was standing outside the residence. The woman told icers she'd been battered by her ex-boyfriend, Tomes, with whom she said she shared a residence. The woman claimed she and Tomes recently broke up and that she was at the residence to gather her belongings, which she claimed were still inside. According to court documents, the woman went on to tell icers she had entered the residence when Steven advised that he did not want her in the residence. Then an argument ensued until it escalated with Steven trying to push her out of the residence and then pushing her down, causing her to strike her head on the couch. Court documents indicated the alleged victim had redness on her forehead and a red mark on her upper left arm.She told icers the mark on her forehead was from striking her head on the couch. After indicating she wanted to pursue charges, the alleged victim refused medical treatment, and icers MORE THAN 31,000 DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY & MORE THAN 320,000 MONTHLY PAGE VIEWS AT KOKOMOPERSPECTIVE.COM Kokomoperspective.com 209 N. Main St. - Kokomo 765.452.0055 January 9, 2019 by Devin Zimmerman News Reporter dzimmerman@kokomoperspective.com by Devin Zimmerman News Reporter dzimmerman@kokomoperspective.com Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon. Expires 1-31-19 CHICKEN TENDERS lunch and dinner $2 Tomes Inside: Section C January 9 2019 Inside: Section C PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID KOKOMO, IN PERMIT NO. 60 **************ECRWSSEDDM************** Residential & Business Customer Riverfront A5 Battery A5 Corrections officer jailed for domestic battery Steven Tomes remains employed at county jail Perspective Photo / Slater Young APARTMENT LIVING - 306 Riverfront District Apartments officially opened last year and now is about one-third occupied. A significant portion of the complex's tenants is from outside Howard County. by Devin Zimmerman News Reporter dzimmerman@kokomoperspective.com Town hall to convene for autoworkers exposed to deadly chemicals Meeting held by daughter of man who died of benzene exposure and settled civil suit After working at Del- co Electronics for nearly three decades, one Ko- komo man died after ex- posure to harmful chem- icals. Now, his daughter wants to ensure her fa- ther's memory lives on by sharing information with other autoworkers who also may have been exposed. Sherry Roe's father, Glenn Dukes, worked at Delco Electronics for 28 years. In 2009 doctors di- agnosed him with a rare form of cancer known as acute myeloid leuke- mia (AML). The cancer took his life within two months, and a legal battle ensued between Dukes' estate and multiple com- panies that supplied ma- terials to Delco Electron- ics. It was alleged Dukes incurred the cancer due Perspective Photo / Provided DISEASE - Water sam- ples are taken in front of what was formerly known as Delco Electronics. Chemicals A2 inside

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